Dr. Anderson Looks at a Critical Measurement of the Upper Spine

Dec. 29, 2017

Anyone who has been to a tailor knows it’s important to get the measurements right when buying clothing. And we’ve all seen the amusement park sign “Children must be this tall to ride,” giving some indication of a safe age to experience certain attractions at the park. As important as it is to have accurate measurements in these situations, in medicine it is even more critical. Neurosurgeons, for example, use increasingly sophisticated technology to measure structures and spaces in the … Continue reading Dr. Anderson Looks at a Critical Measurement of the Upper Spine

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Dr. Anderson Reports on the Special Issues Affecting Kids with Spinal Injury

Mar. 16, 2017

When your child says or does something puzzling, do you sometimes wonder what she’s thinking? Have you ever said to yourself, “I would never say or do something like that”? As adults, we have grown-up ways of doing things, and we expect our children to think and behave the way we do at times. Yet kids are not little adults; they think and behave differently. Children are different from adults in other ways too. For one thing, their bodies vary … Continue reading Dr. Anderson Reports on the Special Issues Affecting Kids with Spinal Injury

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Untwisting the Spine: Dr. Anderson Teaches Surgery for Scoliosis

Aug. 5, 2016

Adolescence marks a time when the body goes through many changes, including changes to the spine. Scoliosis is a spinal deformity characterized by excessive side-to-side bending and rotation of the spinal column. When you look at a healthy spine from behind, it appears to be straight from side to side. A spine with scoliosis looks more like the letter “S.” The American Association of Neurological Surgeons reports that most cases of scoliosis occur in adolescence, between ages 10 and 15.

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Spinal Cord Tumor Surgery — It’s Come a Long Way, Baby

Jul. 1, 2016

Step into an operating room at The Spine Hospital at the Neurological Institute of New York today and you’ll find all kinds of high-tech equipment: Digital microscopes that illuminate and magnify the surgical field. Lasers that precisely cut away abnormal tissue. Ultrasonic aspirators that break up and remove tissue fragments. Spine Hospital Director Dr. Paul McCormick uses this equipment and more to perform an extremely delicate kind of spine surgery: removing tumors from inside the spinal cord itself.

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